5 Top Tips for Vegging Up Your January

Azmina Govindji

Azmina Govindji RD MDBA is a consultant nutritionist, award-winning dietitian, global speaker and best-selling author. Her latest book Vegan Savvy: The Expert’s Guide to Nutrition on a Plant-based Diet offers the veg enthusiast quick and clever ways to make sure you’re getting a range of nutrients for good long-term health.

It’s great to see the national movement towards more plant-based eating - and January is the perfect time to give your diet a reboot. Let's make sure that choosing plant-based eating for January means just that - eating more plants. Check out these top tips to help you eat more veg and make your Veganuary the healthiest yet!

  1. Choose colour. The greater the variety of colours in your vegetables, the wider the range of nutrients you’ll get. So try a red beetroot dip (grated beetroot, dairy-free yogurt alternative, garlic granules, chopped peanuts and fresh parsley), purple aubergine boats (roasted aubergine halves, scooped out flesh flavoured with chopped spring onion and black pepper) and pink rhubarb slaw (shredded rhubarb, carrots and white cabbage in lemon juice dressing).
  2. Vegan doesn’t necessarily mean healthy. There’s been an outpouring of vegan foods in supermarkets but not all of them are going to give you the true benefits of vegetables. Be discerning. Choose foods that offer you the goodness of vegetables – stir-fry packs, frozen vegetables and canned beans are convenient, tasty and nutritious.
  3. Kids can learn to love veg. Try not to reinforce the idea that vegetables are unpleasant, and always need to be hidden in foods. Instead, aim to have fun together by trying lots of vegetables with different textures and colours – there are so many to choose from, you’re bound to find a few they really enjoy.
  4. Get creative with convenience foods. If you are opting for a takeaway or ready meal, team it up with extra veg: try adding sweetcorn to a stir-fry, baby spinach to salad, peas to pie, or cauliflower to quinoa. Get into the habit of adding vegetables to each meal so it becomes second nature.
  5. Vegetables have natural goodness. You get folate (folic acid) from radishes, selenium from mushrooms, vitamin K from broccoli, potassium from kale and vitamin A from butternut squash. And vegetables will typically give you fibre and vitamin C. Nutrients such as selenium, vitamin A and folate can help support your immune function.

Find more tips in Azmina's new book: Vegan Savvy.

About the author

Azmina Govindji

Azmina Govindji RD MDBA is a consultant nutritionist, award-winning dietitian, global speaker and best-selling author. Her latest book Vegan Savvy: The Expert’s Guide to Nutrition on a Plant-based Diet offers the veg enthusiast quick and clever ways to make sure you’re getting a range of nutrients for good long-term health.

Sharing is caring!