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Zoe’s Summer-on-a-Stick Salad Sticks with Yogurt-Mint Dip

Zoe Griffiths

Effort:
Complexity:
Cost:

Serves: As many as you like!

Prep time: 5 mins

Ingredients:

Radishes, top and tailed

Iceberg lettuce, chopped into bitesize chunks

Cherry tomatoes

Cooked beetroot, chopped into bitesize chunks

Celery, chopped into small pieces

Peppers, chopped into bitesize chunks

Cucumber, thickly sliced

For the dip:

150g natural low fat yoghurt

1½ tbsp chopped fresh mint

Veg Portions / Serving: 1

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Recipe and photography from Zoe Griffiths

Salad sticks are a fun, attractive and engaging way to get kids more excited about veg! Perfectly portable, they are great for summer campouts, travel, picnics, lunchboxes and BBQs. Get the kids making these salad sticks this summer – it’s as fun to make as it is to eat. Why not come up with your own favourite combinations and share them with us on social, tagging @VegPowerUK and #SaladSticks.

Method:

Thread prepped ingredients onto skewers to make salad sticks, alternating the ingredients whichever way you like.

For the dip: mix ingredients together and serve with the salad sticks.

(If serving cherry tomatoes to young children, it is always best to cut them lengthways first to reduce
the risk of choking.)

Still got ingredients leftover? Toss the remaining chopped ingredients together for a more ‘traditional’ salad and drizzle with dressing or the yogurt mint dip before serving. To keep it portable, make sure you keep the salad ingredients in a separate container to the dressing/dip and add at the last minute to keep everything fresh and crisp. Add a little cooked meat or cheese, croutons or torn bread if you like.

Engaging Kids

Engaging Kids

Kids who engage regularly with veg through veg-themed activities, such as arts and crafts, sensory experiences, growing and cooking are shown to be more likely to eat the veg they engage with. Encouraging kids to engage and play with veg is the handy first step to them developing a good relationship with veg and life-long healthy eating.

Kids in the kitchen

Kids in the kitchen

Kids can really take charge here, which is part of why salad sticks are so popular with them! Make sure to prep any chopped ingredients for them, and keep an eye on their fingers around the sharp end of the skewer, but otherwise let them build it themselves. Help them with any harder ingredients, and let them make the dip.

Activities

Activities

While getting kids to interact with veggies for real and using their senses to explore them is best, encouraging hands off activities like arts & crafts, puzzles & games or at-home science experiments can be a great start, particularly for those who are fussier eaters or struggle with anything too sensory. Use these veg-themed activities as a stepping stone to interacting with the veg themselves. We have loads of crafty downloads here, puzzles here, and quirky science with veg here.

Sensory

Sensory

Once you feel your child is ready to engage a little more, you can show them how to explore the veg you have on hand with their senses, coming up with playful silly descriptions of how a veg smells, feels, looks, sounds and perhaps even tastes. Find ideas, videos and some simple sensory education session ideas to get you started here.

Serving

Serving

The moments before food is offered can be a perfect opportunity for engagement that can help make it more likely a child will eat it! Giving children a sense of ownership in the meal can make a big difference to their feelings going into it and the pride they take in it. You know your child best, but if you aren’t sure where to start, we have some fun and simple ideas for easy roles you can give them in the serving process over here.

Zoe Griffiths

Zoe is a Registered Nutritionist with over 25 years experience working in public health at a national, regional and local level. Zoe has specialised in working with children especially projects related to increasing fruit and veg consumption such as the School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme. Zoe currently runs her own freelance nutrition business, ZG Nutrition, where she runs courses, undertakes food and health research projects and is a Nutrition writer.

zgnutrition.co.uk/

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